Form:Create Tag

Statamic forms serve to collect, report, and reuse user submitted data. This tag handles the HTML markup, redirect behavior, and success/error states and messages for these forms.

Overview

Here we'll be creating a form to submit an entry in a contact form.

{{ form:create in="contact" }}
 
{{ if errors }}
<div class="bg-red-300 text-white p-2">
{{ errors }}
{{ value }}<br>
{{ /errors }}
</div>
{{ /if }}
 
{{ if success }}
<div class="bg-green-300 text-white p-2">
{{ success }}
</div>
{{ /if }}
 
<label>Email</label>
<input type="text" name="email" value="{{ old:email }}" />
 
<label>Message</label>
<textarea name="message" rows="5">{{ old:message }}</textarea>
 
<button>Submit</button>
 
{{ /form:create }}

You can also use the shorthand syntax for form:create in="contact".

{{ form:contact }}
...
{{ /form:contact }}

When you need to render a form that's selected via the Form Fieldtype you can use this pattern:

{{ form:create in="{ form_fieldtype:handle }" }}
...
{{ /form:create }}

This way you can let Control Panel users selected which form should be used on an entry.

Dynamic Rendering

Instead of hardcoding individual fields, you may loop through the fields array to render fields in a dynamic fashion.

{{ fields }}
<div class="p-2">
<label>
{{ display }}
{{ if validate | contains:required }}
<sup class="text-red">*</sup>
{{ /if }}
</label>
<div class="p-1">{{ field }}</div>
{{ if error }}
<p class="text-gray-500">{{ error }}</p>
{{ /if }}
</div>
{{ /fields }}

Each item in the fields array contains the following data configurable in the form's blueprint.

Variable Type Description
handle string System name for the field
display string User-friendly field label
type string Name of the fieldtype
field string Pre-rendered HTML based on the fieldtype
error string Error message from an unsuccessful submission
old array Contains user input from an unsuccessful submission
instructions string User-friendly instructions label
validate array Contains an array of validation rules

Pre-rendered HTML

Using the field variable will intelligently render inputs as inputs, textareas as textareas, and snozzberries as snozzberries.

You can customize these pre-rendered snippets by running php artisan vendor:publish --tag=statamic-forms. It will expose editable templates snippets in your views/vendor/statamic/forms/fields directory that will be used by each fieldtype.

This approach, combined with the blueprint editor, will give you something very similar to a traditional "Form Builder" from other platforms.

Example

{{ form:contact }}
{{ fields }}
<div class="mb-2">
<label class="block">{{ display }}</label>
{{ field }}
</div>
{{ /fields }}
{{ /form:contact }}
<form method="POST" action="https://website.example/!/forms/contact">
<input type="hidden" name="_token" value="cN03woeRj5Q0GtlOj7GydsZcRwlyp9VLzfpwDFJZ">
<div class="mb-2">
<label class="block">Name</label>
<input type="text" name="name" value="">
</div>
<div class="mb-2">
<label class="block">Email Address</label>
<input type="text" name="email" value="">
</div>
<div class="mb-2">
<label class="block">Note</label>
<textarea name="message"></textarea>
</div>
</form>

Conditional Fields πŸ†•

You may conditionally show and hide fields by utilizing the conditional fields settings in your form's blueprint editor. Once configured, by including the necessary front-end scripts and enabling JavaScript on the form:create tag, all of the conditional logic will Just Workβ„’.

Statamic includes an Alpine.js driver or you can build your own custom JS driver to wire up whichever framework you prefer.

Including the Scripts

For our Alpine.js example, the first step is to include Alpine, as well as Statamic's front-end helpers.js script:

<script src="https://unpkg.com/[email protected]/dist/cdn.min.js" defer></script>
<script src="/vendor/statamic/frontend/js/helpers.js"></script>

These can be added to your layout just before your </body> tag. Alternatively, you could also work these into your webpack/mix build, but this is the simplest way.

Enabling the JS Driver

The next step is to enable the Alpine JS driver via the js="alpine" parameter.

{{ form:contact js="alpine" }}
...
{{ /form:contact }}

This will generate an Alpine component, with automatic x-data handling that will respect old input when there are validation errors, etc.

Wiring Up the Fields

Finally, you will need to wire up the fields. With Alpine, this is done using x-model on the input to keep it in sync with the component, as well as an x-if to conditionally render the input and its label.

<template x-if="{{ show_field:name }}">
<label>Name</label>
<input type="text" name="name" value="{{ old:name }}" x-model="name" />
</template>

The x-model should reference the field's handle, and the x-if should reference the appropriate show_field JS generated by Statamic; In this case, x-model="name" and x-if="{{ show_field:name }}" respectively.

Wiring Up Dynamically Rendered Fields

If you are dynamically rendering your fields using the fields loop, your template might look something like this:

{{ fields }}
<template x-if="{{ show_field }}">
<div class="p-2">
<label>{{ display }}</label>
<div class="p-1">{{ field }}</div>
</div>
</template>
{{ /fields }}

The pre-rendered {{ field }} input will automatically render x-model for you, but you'll still need to wrap your input and its label with an x-if="{{ show_field }}, as shown above.

Scoping Your Alpine Data

If you are using other Alpine components in your form or on your page, the included Alpine driver allows you to scope the generated x-data to prevent conflicts with your other components. To do this, provide a scope key when enabling the JS driver.

{{ form:contact js="alpine:contact_form" }}
...
{{ /form:contact }}

The above will nest your form fields in a contact_form object within the generated x-data.

If you are hardcoding your inputs, you will need adjust your x-model to follow suit.

<template x-if="{{ show_field:name }}">
<label>Name</label>
<input type="text" name="name" value="{{ old:name }}" x-model="contact_form.name" />
</template>

If you are dynamically rendering your fields using the fields loop, this is once again handled for you.

Custom JS Drivers

Should you need to work with another JS framework for handling conditional fields and form state in realtime, we've provided a few tools to help you build your own JS driver.

Creating the Driver

To write a custom JS form driver, create a class and extend Statamic\Forms\JsDrivers\AbstractJsDriver.

<?php
 
namespace App\Forms;
 
use Statamic\Forms\JsDrivers\AbstractJsDriver;
use Statamic\Statamic;
 
class RadJs extends AbstractJsDriver
{
public function addToFormAttributes()
{
return [
'r-data' => Statamic::modify($this->getInitialFormData())->toJson()->entities(),
];
}
 
public function addToRenderableFieldAttributes($field)
{
return [
'r-model' => $field->handle(),
];
}
 
public function addToRenderableFieldData($field, $data)
{
$conditions = Statamic::modify($field->conditions())->toJson()->entities();
 
return [
'show_field' => 'Statamic.$conditions.showField('.$conditions.', $data)',
];
}
}

In this above example, we provide r-data and r-model attributes for a fictional framework called Rad.js, as well as show_field conditional logic for each renderable field.

Hot Tip!

For a more real-world example, here is how you could create a custom driver for Vue.js. Of course, you should also check out our built-in Alpine.js driver.

Registering the Driver

To register your custom JS form driver class, simply call its static register() method from within a service provider.

public function register()
{
\App\Forms\RadJs::register();
}

Driver Requirements

The only true requirement of your custom driver is that you return show_field javascript from the addToRenderableFieldData() method, so that the user can wire up show_field conditional logic as per the documentation above.

Available Methods and Properties

Take a look at the AbstractJsDriver class to see what is available to you, but here is a list of available methods and properties at a glance:

Definable Render Methods

  • Define an addToFormData($data) method in your class to add to the available data within the form:create tag pair.
  • Define an addToFormAttributes() method in your class to add custom HTML attributes to your <form> element.
  • Define an addToRenderableFieldData($field, $data) method in your class to add to the available data for each field within the fields loop.
  • Define an addToRenderableFieldAttributes($field) method in your class to add custom HTML attributes to each pre-rendered field field input within the fields loop.
  • Define a render($html) method to control the overall rendering of your form component HTML.

Callable Helper Methods

  • Call $this->getInitialFormData() to get the initial form field values from the server, while respecting old input when there are validation errors, etc.

Driver Properties

  • The $this->form property gives you access to the relevant Statamic\Forms\Form object anywhere within your driver class.
  • The $this->options property gives you access to the passed driver options.

Driver Options

You can also pass comma-delimited options into the js parameter like so:

{{ form:contact js="radjs:foo:bar" }}
...
{{ /form:contact }}

Within your driver class, you'll be able to access $this->options to retrieve an array of options (ie. ['foo', 'bar'] in the example above).

The Helpers.js Script

The Statamic.$conditions.showField(conditions, data) helper is available when including the helpers.js script:

<script src="/vendor/statamic/frontend/js/helpers.js"></script>

The conditions parameter accepts your field's conditions, typically generated using $field->conditions().

The data parameter accept's an object containing your form's values, typically stored somewhere within your form's javascript state.

This JS helper will evaluate your field conditions in realtime against your form's field values to determine whether or not the field in question should be shown.

Parameters

handle|is|in|form|formset

string

Specify the name of the form. Only required if you do not use the form:set tag, or don't have a form defined in the current context.

redirect

string

The location your user will be taken after a successful form submission. If left blank, the user will stay on the same page.

error_redirect

string

The location your user will be taken after a failed form submission. If left blank, the user will stay on the same page.

allow_request_redirect

boolean

When true, the redirect and error_redirect parameters will get overridden by redirect and error_redirect query parameters in the URL. For example, ?redirect=/thanks

csrf

boolean

When false, the hidden name="_token" attribute won't be added to the form so you can use other ways of providing the token. Defaults to true.

files

boolean

When true, the enctype="multipart/form-data" attribute will be rendered on your <form> tag for file uploads.

js

string

Enable conditional fields using one of the provided JS drivers.

HTML Attributes

string

Set HTML attributes as if you were on an HTML element. For example, class="required" id="contact-form".

Variables

Variable Type Description

fields

array

An array of available fields for dynamic rendering.

errors

array

An indexed array of any validation errors upon submission. For example: {{ errors }}{{ value }}{{ /errors }}

error

array

An array of validation errors indexed by field name. For example: {{ error:email }}

old

array

An array of submitted values from the previous request. Used for re-populating fields if there are validation errors.

success

string

A success message, usually used in a condition to check of a form submission was successful. {{ if success }} Hurray! {{ /if }}

submission_created

boolean

A success boolean, which differs from success in that it will actually return falsey when the honeypot is filled. This can be useful when you want to show a fake success message for honeypot spam, but want to prevent analytics tracking code from being rendered.

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